Spring 2017 Events

April 11, 2017

Department of Ethnic Studies Undergraduate Student Colloquium II

 

Tuesday, April 11

3:00 - 4:30 pm

George Hall 301B (AQ Room)

 

Our students will be presenting the research they have done as part of their Ethnic Studies courses.

Featuring:

 

  • Kelsey Kato - "The Reproduction of Heteronormativity in American Schools from Grade 6-12"
  • Iñuuraq Evans - "Miss World Eskimno-Indian Olympics Pagwant: What is Missing?"
  • Demetrius Reed Tellez - "Toxic Masculinity in Hip Hop: Women and Transgressing Commerical Rap"
  • Julian Glenn - "The Creation of the Black Students' Association: A profile of Jacques Brunvil and Student Organizing"
  • Nathan Kawanishi - "Homeland and Ethnic Identity in Music and Art"

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

April 9, 2017

Okinawa: The Afterburn

 

Sunday, April 9

1:00 - 4:00 pm

Shidler College of Business Room A-101

 

Okinawa: The Afterburn is the first documentary film that provides a comprehensive view of the Battle of Okinawa, its aftermath and the ongoing struggles of the local people. The showing will be followed by a discussion led by Producer John Junkerman.

 

Screening co-sponsored by: UHM Center of Okinawan Studies, UHM Ethnic Studies Department, Pacific –Asian Legal Studies Program, UHM William S. Richardson School of Law

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

April 6, 2017

Imagining Sustainable Futures: Environmental Justice, Sensing Policy and Collaboration with Coastal Indigenous Communities

 

Thursday, April 6

3:00 - 4:20 pm

Crawford Hall 105

 

This is the first talk in the College of Social Science's Sustainability Job Talk Series.

 

Sarah Marie Wiebe is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow from Coast Salish territory (British Columbia, Canada) based jointly at the University of Victoria and University of British Columbia. She directs a collaborative community-based Reimagining Attawapiskat project alongside Cree youth, is a Co- Director for the Seascape Indigenous Storytelling Studio and a Research Affiliate with the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance. She recently released a book titled Everyday Exposure: Indigenous Mobilization and Environmental Justice in Canada’s Chemical Valley.

 

Aiming to challenge the colonial production of toxic body politics, her research argues that social and political transformation requires an experiential “sensing policy” approach to environmental justice. Her future research will continue to collaborate with coastal communities in Canada, Hawai‘i and the Pacific to understand how communities that encounter contaminated land and seascapes mobilize to resist the toxic geopolitics that encroach upon them.

 

To view the flyer for Sarah Marie Wiebe's talk, click here.

To view the flyer for the Sustainability Job Talk Series, click here.

 

 

April 4, 2017

The Doubleness of Sound at Canada’s Indian Residential Schools

 

Tuesday, April 4

5:00 - 6:00 pm

Queen Lili’uokalani Center for Student Services

 

The Ethnomusicology Association at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa is proud to present their 7th annual "Words on Music" event featuring the renowned ethnomusicologist, Dr. Beverley Diamond who focuses on colonialism and Indigenous issues through music. Dr. Diamond considers sound and music in the schools themselves as both tools of oppression and assimilation, on one hand, and agency/trauma relief, on the other hand. She also looks at music in the context of the recent Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools in Canada.There will be a reception after the talk.

 

Dr. Beverley Diamond, Ethnomusicology Professor Emeritus from Memorial University of Newfoundland School of Music, Canada, is known for her research on gender issues, Canadian historiography, and indigenous music cultures. Her research on indigenous music has ranged from studies of traditional Inuit and First Nations song traditions and Saami joik, to indigenous audio recording, traditional protocols for access and ownership, and, most recently, expressive culture in relation to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on residential schools in Canada. Dr. Diamond’s publications include the books Native American Music in Eastern North America, Musical Instruments of First Nations Communities in Northeastern America, as well as several co-edited anthologies. In 2008 Dr. Diamond was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, considered to be the highest academic honor in Canada.

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

May 4, 2017

Falling Walls Lab

 

Thursday, May 4

Institute for Astronomy

2680 Woodlawn Drive

 

The UHM Institute for Astronomy will host Hawaii's first Falling Walls Lab. Each participant will be given three minutes to present an original work of research, initiative or business model. The local winner earning a presentation spot at the International Falling Walls Conference in Berlin, Germany, in November 2017.

 

Eligibility: bachelor and professional degree university students, holders of PhDs, professors, entrepreneurs and early-career professionals.

Applications will be accepted here until Friday, March 24, 2017.

 

For more information, please view the Falling Walls site or visit the UH News Story.

 

 

March 23, 2017

We Gon' Be Alright: Race and the Politics of Identity in the Era of Trump and Resegregation

 

Thursday, March 23

3:00 - 4:30 pm

George Hall 207

 

Jeff Chang is the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford University. His books include Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation, which won the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award, Total Chaos: The Art and Aesthetics of Hip-Hop, Who We Be: The Colorization of America (published in paperback in January 2016 under the new title, Who We Be: A Cultural History of Race in Post Civil Rights America). His latest, We Gon' Be Alright: Notes On Race and Resegregation, was published in September 2016. His next book will be a biography of Bruce Lee.

 

Jeff co-founded CultureStr/ke and ColorLines. He was named by The Utne Reader as one of "50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Your World" and by KQED as an Asian Pacific American Local Hero. He has been a USA Ford Fellow in Literature with H. Samy Alim, he was the 2014 winner of the St. Clair Drake Teaching Award at Stanford University.

 

This talk was made possible by the co-sponsorships of Ethnic Studies Student Association (ESSA), Student Equity Excellence and Diversity (SEED), Student Athletic and Program Fee Board (SAPFB), and the Department of Ethnic Studies at UH Manoa

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

March 22, 2017

Organizing with Love in the Age of Anger

 

Wednesday, March 22

6:00 - 8:30 pm

Art Building Auditorium

 

Ai-Jen Poo, Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, Co-Director of Caring Across Generations, and one of the organizers of the Women's March will be delivering a keynote address on "Organizing with Love in the Age of Anger." She has been selected as this Spring's Dan and Maggie Inouye Distinguished Chair in Democratic Ideals.

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

March 18, 2017

Assessment and Transformative Collaboration in Sustainability Education

 

Saturday, March 18

9:00 am - 4:00 pm

University of Hawaiʻi at West Oʻahu

 

SENCER Hawaiʻi and the SENCER Center for Innovation-West are jointly hosting the 3rd Annual SENCER Hawaiʻi Spring Institute/SCI-West Regional Meeting focusing on innovative teaching and learning through high-impact practices (e.g. undergraduate research and community engagement) and compelling civic issues, particularly around sustainability.

 

To view SENCER's website, find out more information and register for this event, click here. The registration fee is $25. Refreshments and lunch will be provided.

 

For any questions, please contact SCI-West Co-Director Ulla Hasager at ulla@hawaii.edu or 808 330 1276, or Kelly Uchiumi, kuchiumi@scu.edu, Assistant for SCI-West.

 

 

March 16, 2017

What Is Your Kuleana?

 

Thursday, March 16

4:30 - 6:00 pm

ACCESS Lounge in Dean Hall 5/6

 

A talk, brought to you by the Ethnic Studies Student Association (ESSA), about what your kuleana (responsibility) is to this place and people as a Native Hawaiian or non-Hawaiian. Kaleikoa Kaʻeo, Native Hawaiian activist and educator from the island of Maui, will be sharing his ʻike (knowledge) on this topic. Along with Kaleikoa Kaʻeo, we will have student speakers who are non-Hawaiian with a sense of kuleana to Hawaiʻi sharing their ʻike and experiences. Questions and discussion welcome.

 

This event is co-sponsered by Native Hawaiian Student Services (NHSS), Pacific Advocates People's Association (PAPA), the Ethnic Studies department, and Student Activity and Program Fee Board (SAPFB).

 

For any questions, please contact Kawehi Kina at kinak@hawaii.edu.

Free food will be provided by Da Spot.

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

March 14, 2017

Department of Ethnic Studies Undergraduate Student Colloquium I

 

Tuesday, March 14

3:00 - 4:30 pm

George Hall 301B

 

Our students will be presenting the research they have done as part of their Ethnic Studies courses.

Featuring:

 

  • Patrick Castro - "Where There Was Once Garbage"
  • Alyssa Demello - "In Japan, But Not Of It"
  • Aina Iglesias - "Familial or Financial Survival: A Dilemma Faced by Filipina Housekeepers in Hawaii"
  • Lisa Grandinetti - "Writing Indigenous and Women Into Hawaiʻi’s History of Resistance
  • Jaynie Stone - "An Unbroken Chain of Title"

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

March 9, 2017

I Will Build A Great Wall: Notes On Borders, Immigrants and the Future in the Age of Trump

 

Thursday, March 9

3:30 - 5:00 pm

BUSAD A102

 

Per Díazʻs website, "Junot Díaz was born in the Dominican Republic and raised in New Jersey. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Drown; The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award; and This Is How You Lose Her, a New York Times bestseller and National Book Award finalist. He is the recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, PEN/Malamud Award, Dayton Literary Peace Prize, Guggenheim Fellowship, and PEN/O. Henry Award."

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

March 9, 2017

The Art of Writing Comics

 

Thursday, March 9

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Kuykendall Hall 410

 

Marjorie Liu presents this workshop that will begin with a discussion of the comic book medium, the basics of script writing, followed by an in-class exercise — and then a question and answer session of what it’s like to write comics.

 

Her extensive work with Marvel includes the bestselling Dark Wolverine series, NYX: No Way Home, X-23, and Black Widow: The Name of the Rose. Ms. Liu also wrote the story for the animated film, Avengers Confidential: Black Widow and Punisher, which was produced by Marvel, Sony Pictures Entertainment (Japan) Inc., and Madhouse Inc. She is also the author of more than 19 novels, most notably the urban fantasy series, Hunter Kiss, and the paranormal romance series, Dirk & Steele.

 

Her newest work is MONSTRESS, an original, creator-owned comic book series with Japanese artist (and X-23 collaborator) Sana Takeda. For more details about her work, view the subsequent event titled "Be Fearless: Writing about Race, Sexuality, and Feminism"

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

March 8, 2017

Junot Díazʻs Public Reading and Reception

 

Wednesday, March 8

7:00 pm (reception begins at 6:15 pm)

Art Auditorium

Free and open to the public

 

Per Díazʻs website, "Junot Díaz was born in the Dominican Republic and raised in New Jersey. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Drown; The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award; and This Is How You Lose Her, a New York Times bestseller and National Book Award finalist. He is the recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, PEN/Malamud Award, Dayton Literary Peace Prize, Guggenheim Fellowship, and PEN/O. Henry Award."

 

Junot Diaz's' visit was made possible, in part, by generous donations from alumni and friends of the Colleges of Arts & Sciences to the Expanding the Student Experience Fund of the UH Foundation. Generously funded as well by the Joseph Keene Chadwick Lecture Fund, UH-Mänoa English Department's Words@Mānoa, and SEED. Cosponsors: American Studies, English, Ethnic Studies, History, Political Science, UH - Students and Faculty for Justice in Palestine, Hawai'i American Studies Association (HASA), UHM Graduate Student Organization (GSO).

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

March 7, 2017

Be Fearless: Writing about Race, Sexuality, and Feminism

 

Tuesday, March 7

3:00 - 4:30 pm

Kuykendall Hall 410

 

New York Times bestselling and award-winning writer, Marjorie Liu will host a discussion on how comics and fiction can be used not only to entertain, but to comment on issues of race, gender, sexuality, and trauma. She teaches comic book writing at MIT, and she leads a class on Popular Fiction at the Voices of Our Nation (VONA) workshop.

 

She received national media attention for Astonishing X-Men, which featured the gay wedding of X-Man Northstar and was subsequently nominated for a GLAAD Media Award for outstanding media images of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

 

Marjorie Liu's visit is generously funded by the Joseph Keene Chadwick Memorial Lecture Series. Co-sponsors: UHM Department of English, American Studies, and Ethnic Studies, Hawai'i chapter of American Studies Association (HASA).

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

February 28, 2017

Africa is in the Pacific: Black Colonization to Hawaiʻi and the Philippines, 1835-1964

 

Tuesday, February 28

3:00 - 4:30 pm

Crawford Hall 115

 

Island hopping across the shores of Jamaica, Luzon, St. Helena, Madagascar, Hawaiʻi, and Grenada, this talk will map the intellectual, cultural, and material circulations between peoples of African descent and the indigenous residents of the Pacific. The moʻolelo of enslaved plantation workers, political activists, heads of state, teachers, chefs, and children will be woven together as people of color around the world collectively confront the global birth of American empire amidst the end of American chattel slavery.

 

Guy Emerson Mount currently works at the University of Chicago where he is the Coordinator of the U.S. History Workshop and a PhD candidate. He was recently awarded a Mellon Foundation Fellowship and honored by the Eisenhower Institute as well as the American Historical Association for his in-progress dissertation, “The Last Reconstruction: Race, Nation, and Empire in the Black Pacific.” Mr. Mount has published several articles and book reviews on African American history and writes a monthly column for Black Perspectives, the online publication of the African American Intellectual History Society.

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

February 21, 2017

Blackness at the Margins of Empire: African American Soldiers in Okinawa: The Colonized-Colonizer Paradox and African American Soldier-Okinawan Relations

 

Tuesday, February 21

3:00 - 4:30 pm

Crawford Hall 115

 

Ethan Caldwell is a doctoral candidate in the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. He is also a lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a professional photographer. Caldwell studies how post-World War II Black-Asian relations, militarism, and empire in East Asia impacts constructions of race, gender, empire, and Blackness abroad. His dissertation, "Blackness at the Margins of Empire: The Colonized-Colonizer Paradox and African American Soldier-Okinawan Relations," analyzes how dynamic constructions of race, gender, and empire are historically and visually formed, challenged, and impacted through interactions between African American soldiers and Okinawan civilians.`

 

This research increases the existing historical purview surrounding relations between African American soldiers, Okinawans, and Japanese civilians post-World War to complicate non-white subjectivity, oppression, power, and privilege through military service in Okinawa. It recontextualizes U.S. based racial norms through diasporic Black bodies and their interactions in globally occupied, militarized spaces.

 

To view the flyer, click here.

 

 

February 4 to 17, 2017

Honolulu Museum of Art's African American Film Festival

 

Saturday, February 4 to Friday, February 17

Honolulu Museum of Art

900 S Beretania St, Honolulu, HI 96814

 

As a community sponsor, Ethnic Studies welcomes you to visit the Honolulu Museum of Art's African American Film Festival. Honolulu Museum of Art relays, "This year, the museum aligns the festival with concerts, a hip-hop education workshop, live theater, and a textile exhibition, with a focus on female voices of African descent."

 

Of particular interest to our department are:

  • Feb 4, 6pm and Feb 5, 4pm: The film, Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise, which will be screening during the opening night.
  • Feb 11, 1pm: Lecture:Art & Racial Justice: Conversation with Patrisse Cullors & Alicia Garza, Co-founders of Black Lives Matter.
  • Feb 12, 7pm: Film: 13th + panel featuring Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors (free admission).

 

To view the flyer, click here.

To view the Festival's webpage, click here.

To view the Museum of Art's February calender, click here.

 

 

January 17, 2017

Remeberance March to ʻIolani Palace

 

Tuesday, January 17

10:00 am

Maunaʻala (Royal Mausoleum)

2261 Nuuanu Ave, Honolulu, Hawaii 96817

 

There will be a visit to the mausoleum (no food or flags allowed inside) and then the walk begins to ʻIolani Palace. There will also be hoʻokupu (offerings) at the Queenʻs statue, an ʻawa ceremony, and a small gathering at ʻIolani Palace.

 

There will be transportation from the State Capitol to Maunaʻala around 9 am.

 

 

January 16, 2017

Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade

 

Monday, January 16

8:00 am - 11:30 am

Ala Moana Beach Park - Magic Island

 

Come by the Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade to walk, sign wave and more. Friends from the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Ethnic Studies Student Association, and the Black Students Association among many others will be there.

 

To view the Facebook event, click here.