Spring 2016 Events

February 5, 2016

Oceanic Connections: Home-less, house-less, home-free, free ...?
Exploring Oceanic Experiences and Perceptions of “Homelessness” in Hawaiʻi

 

Friday, February 5, 2016

9:00am - 1:00pm

UH Mānoa, ACCESS Lounge, Deam Hall 05/06

 

Talk-story sessions with homeless of Oceanic ancestry, those on the ground, who work with and in homeless communities, and UHM faculty and students. Networking lunch.

 

In spite of the current overwhelming media attention to "homelessness" and large amounts of funding allocated to dealing with it, there is a strong need to create a solid knowledge base and analysis of the situation in Hawaiʻi - not least a need to hear from the people on the ground: the "homeless" themselves and people who work with them on a daily basis.

 

For view the flyer, click here.

 

 

February 23, 2016

Black Studies Matters

 

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

3:00pm - 4:30pm

Geroge Hall 301B

 

The Ethnic Studies department at UH Mānoa has been asking Dean Konan of the College of Social Sciences for funding to fill the African American specialist position. Although the hiring freeze is no longer in effect and there has been hiring in other departments, she has refused to prioritize Ethnic Studies and fund this position.

 

Join us on Tuesday in discussing why African American Studies and Ethnic Studies matter to us as individuals, the university, and the community! ʻAwa and pupus will be provided. We will also be strategizing our next steps to keep putting pressure on the administration to fill this position.

 

Here's the link to the petition to support our cause:

tinyurl.com/blackstudies

 

For view the flyer, click here.

 

 

April 6, 2016

LITERACY LOVE

 

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

3:00pm

Geroge Hall 301

 

D. Watkins will use his personal story of literacy advocacy as a backdrop to discuss how skill sharing can be a revolutionary act that can uplift and empower communities. D. Watkins teaches writing in the English and Creative Writing program at the University of Baltimore. He is a columnist as well for Salon magazine and his work has been published in The New York Times, The Guardian, Rolling Stone, and other magazines. The Beast Side is his debut collection of essays and his memoir The Cook-Up will be released by Grand Central in May 2016. Website: d-watkins.com

 

Co-Sponsors: Ethnic Studies Student Association and Afrocentric Society of Hawai’i.

 

For information, contact esdept@hawaii.edu

 

For view the flyer, click here.

 

 

April 6, 2016

African and Native American Contact: Evidence from a Smithsonian Exhibit & A conversation on why Black Studies matters for Hawaiian Studies and Indigenous Studies featuring Robert Collins, Chuck Lawrence, and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua

 

The Department of Ethnic Studies, Native Hawaiian Student Services, Hawai‘i American Studies Association, and the Afrocentric Society of Hawai‘i invites you to join and participate in events with Robert Collins that will examine the connections between Black Studies and Indigenous Studies. Robert Keith Collins, PhD, an anthropologist, is Associate Professor of American Indian Studies in the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University. He holds a BA in Anthropology and a BA in Native American Studies from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Collins also holds both an MA and PhD in Anthropology from UCLA. Using a person-centered ethnographic approach, his research explores American Indian cultural changes and African and Native American interactions in North, Central, and South America. There will be two public talks:

 

(1) “African and Native American Contact: Evidence from a Smithsonian Exhibit”
Tuesday, April 26, 3:00pm - 4:30pm
George Hall 301B

 

(2) A conversation on why Black Studies matters for Hawaiian Studies and Indigenous Studies featuring Robert Collins, Chuck Lawrence, and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua
Thursday, April 28, 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Dean Hall 5/6

 

For view the flyer, click here.